Posts Tagged ‘republican’

Republican Debate – My Answers

June 15, 2011

Two nights ago was the New Hampshire Republican debate on CNN. While I am a big supporter of Ron Paul, I don’t think his message was simple enough for the mainstream voters to consume. He jumped over his simple talking points about the Federal Reserve, Austrian Economics, Sound Money and Blowback among others and went right into rants that were valid, but made him sound more like a fringe candidate than a serious one.

I’m not saying that the two “winners,” Mitt Romney or Michelle Bachmann said anything of substance, but their message was well packaged. If Congressman Paul could just stick to clear, concise points while still spreading his message of liberty and Constitutionalism, he would come out as a clear frontrunner.

I only watched the first part of the debate last night, but if I had to give a response to some of the questions that were asked, here are a few:

1. What is your plan to create manufacturing  jobs in the US?

Currently in the United States, we have a service based economy. We do not have a manufacturing/production based one like we had in the past. Most of the manufacturing of products we import is in China or other Asian countries. The only way we are going to start manufacturing here is that we need the capital and labor to compete with China. In “capital,” I mean machines and resources. We need to invest in these machines so we can be competitive. Even if labor and materials are cheaper in China, we still have to ship all those products across the Pacific Ocean. It’s not really as efficient as we think. There is opportunity for us to start producing products again.

First, we need to cut the corporate tax to zero. There is no need to tax corporate profits and then tax them again when they get distributed to employees as pay. Second, we need to encourage investment in American capital. The easiest way to do this is to get the Federal Government out of economic planning. Stop subsidizing certain industries. Let the market decide what industries and products we should develop. We could be throwing money down the drain because an industry we are supporting might not be able to exist without the subsidies. That makes no economic sense and would never exist in a market based economy.

Bottom line is that we need to make things again, and in order to do that we need to let the market work and the capital invested here at home to do that.

2. What are your feelings on “Right to Work”?

Personally, I believe that the Federal Government should not be involved in the hiring process of a private company. However, we have installed labor laws that call for a closed shop if half of the workers decide to unionize. So, “Right to Work” is a counter to these regulations, but it really doesn’t work. It would be easier to defund the National Labor Relations Board and repeal labor laws that interfere with hiring process of a private firm, union or not.

Let the company, workers, and the market decide what they want to do. If Company A wants to run a closed shop with union employees, let them. If Company B wants to use non-union labor, there’s nothing wrong with that either. The point is that the Federal Government should just stay out of it altogether.

3. How would you build consensus within the Republican Party, not just Tea Partiers?

I feel the message of freedom and liberty are what the Founding Fathers of our nation wanted. This should resonate with every American, not just Republicans or Democrats. To me, it should be easy to build consensus to get the government out of our lives, out of the private sector and out of foreign wars and entanglements.

Then you would be free to live your life the way you want. Businesses will be able to hire people and deliver new and innovative products to the market. We would stop spending hundreds of billions of dollars overseas and would be able to pass that savings along to the taxpayers.

We need to remember the reasons for the Constitution that the Framers had in mind at the time. We broke away from a too powerful and distant foreign central government. This country was founded on the principle of limited central government and if we remember that, building a consensus should not be too difficult.

As I watch more of the debate tonight, I’ll post more answers. Your comments are always welcome. Thanks for reading.

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The GOP Needs to Embrace Ron Paul

May 18, 2009

Lately, I’ve been reading articles about the state of dissarray the Republican Party is in, and how there is a leadership void in the party.  The Republican National Committee Chairman, Michael Steele, says he’s the leader.  Rush Limbaugh wants to be the voice of the party.  Ex-Vice President Dick Cheney is going on every talk show he can trying to further push the George Bush Neo-Conservative agenda.  The Democrats have seized on this opportunity and have poked and prodded the GOP into making rash statements and decisions, further pushing them into a hole.

The funny thing, is that the Republican Party has a leader, with millions of followers, but they don’t want to acknowledge him.  The person is Ron Paul, and whether the rest of the GOP likes it or not, he is the true leader of the conservative, constitutionalist, Republican movement.  He understands the issues facing the country, and can back up what he says with his record.

All you have to do is look at all of the talk shows Dr. Paul has been making appearances on lately.  He is the only member of the GOP that is regularly on Fox, CNBC, MSNBC, and CNN.  He also set fundraising records during his Presidential campaign during the Republican primaries.  Plus, he won an NCAA basketball style bracket of GOP contenders on NPR.com by way of the votes of visitors on the site.

With the Democrats and Republicans growing closer together, with only a few billion dollars spending here or there between them, the GOP needs to separate itself and really stand up for the small government our founding fathers envisioned, and the freedom and liberty of all citizens.  With Ron Paul as the head of the GOP, we could get this country back on the right track and back to the way it is supposed to be.  If we keep down the current path, we will see less prosperity, less freedom, and more pain for the American people.  There is an answer to our problems, and the Republicans need to wake up and embrace him.

Typical Republicans in Orange County

April 28, 2009

On April 20th, the Orange County GOP Committee voted in favor of a resolution that gives a vote of “no confidence” to the new Sheriff and her concealed carry weapons (CCW) stance.  She wants to review and revoke CCW permits that were already issued.  You can read about the vote here on the RedCounty.com site.

The first steps in eliminating the freedom of the masses is to disarm them.  That is why the Founding Fathers wrote the Second Amendment.  We have the right to bear arms in order to keep a tyrannical government from taking over.  The point is that if the authorities are armed, the citizens should be as well.

It’s fine that the Republicans in my county want to stand up for the rights of gun owners.  Supposedly, they also stand for small government, freedom, liberty and the Constitution.  Then how do you get to this statement?

Finally, we call for the elimination of waiting periods to purchase firearms and instead support complete implementation of instant background checks.

So, what the Orange County GOP is saying is that they believe in the Constitution, the Second Amendment, limited government, freedom, liberty and the right for the Federal Government, led by the FBI, to maintain a database with our names and any records that would deny us from purchasing a gun.  

How can you be for small government and freedom and liberty when you are relying on a central database maintained by the FBI?  This is exactly the kind of big government Republicans are supposed to be against.  

As a proponent of the Constitution, freedom, liberty and small government, I would sacrifice the “instant background check” for one that was performed by a third party that took a few days.  They would then destroy the records so that no one can use them for other purposes.  

Any power we grant the central government is abused.  By trying to appease the gun lobby, Republicans fall right back into the big government trap by letting the central government maintain a database of our personal information.  The GOP needs to start really standing for limited government and individual liberty, not just paying lip service to it.

The Problem with Tea Parties

April 13, 2009

There is going to be a Tea Party in Santa Ana, which is close to my hometown of Huntington Beach.  There is a series of speakers, one of which is Dana Rohrbacher, who is my Congressman.  He’s been in the House since 1988.

My big problem with this is that he was in Congress during the Bush years, when the Federal Government grew to the largest it’s ever been.  Now, all of a sudden he’s outraged?  Where was he speaking out against the budgets and taxes under the Bush Administration?

There is a political theory that when a party is out of power, they go back to their core principles, only to abandon those principles and grow the government when they go back into power.  How true is this of the Republican party?  They pushed for the biggest growth in government spending in the history of our country when they were the majority, but now that they are in the minority, they are all about fiscal responsibility again.  We need to see this for the fraud it is and not fall for this trap again.

Also, many of these figures act like they support limited government, but all they want to do is trim a program here or there and shift the tax brackets around.  We need more than these little, inconsequential tweaks right now.  We need real change and a political revolution.

We need to start to question the need for central economic planning, led by the Federal Reserve and the monopoly it has on our money supply.  We need to question our fiat currency, and if local currencies backed by gold might be a better way to manage our money.  The first step would be to repeal legal tender laws and to eliminate capital gains taxes on gold money.  Ron Paul has laid out this plan to open up our money supply to competition of gold backed money and fiat money.  This needs to be discussed at any Tea party.

We also need to not just be mad at our money being used for bailouts, but we need to be mad that the government, as Rothbard put it, “legally plunder” from us.  Why is the government entitled to a third of our hard earned money?  We should not just be mad about our money going to bail out Wall Street, but we need to be mad that it is going to build bombs, fight foreign wars, build foreign bridges and roads, and support our welfare state.  In order to truly reform our government, we need to take as much out of the hands of Washington as possible.  Our Constitution lays out the framework for a limited central government and strong local and state power.  We have moved so far from this vision that we have a tyrannical government that has overriding rule over all.  This is what we should be revolting about!

The anger and frustration over the bailouts is a good way to start to build energy towards a revolution, but we can’t keep our scope so limited.  Every one of these Tea Parties need to go beyond the bailouts and taxes and to the Constitution and the vision of our Founding Fathers.  They should have speakers who believe in eliminating the Federal Reserve, cutting or ending the income tax, ending our empire, and drastically reducing the size of our government.  We need to move beyond the symptom, which is the recession we’re in and the bailouts, and really fix our country.

Great Editorial on Health Care

January 7, 2009

Below is one of the best editorials on the state of health care in our country.  It was written by Dr. Tom Price, a member of Congress from Georgia.  I didn’t want to link it because I want to make sure this can be read for a long time.

Please read this and realize that while Obama’s plans sound good, we, as patients, will suffer.  We need health care to focus on doctors and patients, and not accountants, attorneys, and least of all bureaucrats.

Here it is:

The GOP Should Fight Health-Care Rationing

Obama’s HMO deserves principled opposition.

Perhaps the greatest missed opportunity of the past eight years was the chance for Republicans to fundamentally reform the terribly broken American health-care system. Access to quality health care has long been a professed priority, yet Republicans have been reluctant to tackle the issue.

As a physician, this is deeply disappointing to me because patient-centered health care is, at its core, conservative. Health care is fundamentally a personal relationship between patients and doctors. To honor this relationship — consistent with Republican ideals — our goal should be to provide a system that allows access to affordable, quality health care for all Americans, in a way that ensures medical decisions are made in doctors’ offices, not Washington.

Republican unwillingness to address the issue, however, has left us facing an emboldened Democratic Party well equipped to push a government-centered health-care agenda. While Democrats are still dangerously misguided in their policies, this time they are prepared to avoid the political mistakes of the Clinton administration.

For a preview, look no further than “What We Can Do About the Health-Care Crisis,” a book published this year by former Sen. Tom Daschle, President-elect Barack Obama’s choice for secretary of Health and Human Services. Atop the list of worrisome ideas proposed by Mr. Daschle is the creation of an innocently termed “Federal Health Advisory Board.”

This board would offer recommendations to private insurers and create a single standard of care for all public programs, including which procedures doctors may perform, which drugs patients may take, and how many diagnostic machines hospitals really need. As with Medicare, for any care provided outside the board’s guidelines, patients and physicians would not be reimbursed.

Mr. Daschle is quick to note the board’s standards would serve only as a suggestion to the private market. Yet to ensure that there are no rogue private insurers, he has proposed making the employer tax deduction for providing health insurance dependent on compliance with the board’s standards. In an overtly political ruse, Democrats will claim they are dictating nothing to private providers, while whipping noncompliant insurers in place through the tax code.

To be sure, this strategy seeks to eliminate private providers completely. Forced into accepting rigid Washington rules and unsustainable financing mechanisms under Mr. Daschle’s plan, most private insurers would be quickly eradicated. Or, as Mr. Daschle soberly predicts in his book, “the health-care industry would have to reconsider its business plan.”

If we fail to recognize the scope and scale of Democratic ambition on this issue, we will find ourselves with a permanent Washington bureaucracy prescribing patient care. Our goal, however, must not be confined to defeating a Democratic proposal. Instead, we must advocate for a positive approach to health-care reform that does not sacrifice patient care to achieve its goals. This patient-centered approach must be built upon two pillars: access to coverage for all Americans and coverage that is truly owned by patients.

First, we must fundamentally reform the tax code so that it makes sense for all people to have health insurance. This may be readily accomplished through the adoption of tax equity for the purchase of insurance, active pooling mechanisms for increased purchasing power, and focused use of tax deductions and credits. Through positive changes in the tax code we can make health-care cost effective and create incentives so there is no reason to be uninsured. This way, care is purchased without government interference between you and your doctor.

Secondly, we must transform our health-care model to one that is owned and controlled by patients. Currently, most Americans receive coverage through a third party, leaving health-care decisions to an employer or the government. By creating a new system in which Americans are provided the opportunity to purchase whichever health-coverage product fits their personal needs, insurers would be forced to focus on patients. Not until patients truly own their own health plans will we see the accountability and flexibility needed to ensure quality care and necessary cost-lowering efficiencies.

A historic debate about American health care is fast approaching. We are not doomed to a Washington-run bureaucratic health-care system, so long as Republicans push for the right remedy for health care and return to being the party of solutions.

Dr. Price, a Republican member of Congress from Georgia, is the new chairman of the Republican Study Committee.