Posts Tagged ‘debate’

Republican Debate – My Answers

June 15, 2011

Two nights ago was the New Hampshire Republican debate on CNN. While I am a big supporter of Ron Paul, I don’t think his message was simple enough for the mainstream voters to consume. He jumped over his simple talking points about the Federal Reserve, Austrian Economics, Sound Money and Blowback among others and went right into rants that were valid, but made him sound more like a fringe candidate than a serious one.

I’m not saying that the two “winners,” Mitt Romney or Michelle Bachmann said anything of substance, but their message was well packaged. If Congressman Paul could just stick to clear, concise points while still spreading his message of liberty and Constitutionalism, he would come out as a clear frontrunner.

I only watched the first part of the debate last night, but if I had to give a response to some of the questions that were asked, here are a few:

1. What is your plan to create manufacturing  jobs in the US?

Currently in the United States, we have a service based economy. We do not have a manufacturing/production based one like we had in the past. Most of the manufacturing of products we import is in China or other Asian countries. The only way we are going to start manufacturing here is that we need the capital and labor to compete with China. In “capital,” I mean machines and resources. We need to invest in these machines so we can be competitive. Even if labor and materials are cheaper in China, we still have to ship all those products across the Pacific Ocean. It’s not really as efficient as we think. There is opportunity for us to start producing products again.

First, we need to cut the corporate tax to zero. There is no need to tax corporate profits and then tax them again when they get distributed to employees as pay. Second, we need to encourage investment in American capital. The easiest way to do this is to get the Federal Government out of economic planning. Stop subsidizing certain industries. Let the market decide what industries and products we should develop. We could be throwing money down the drain because an industry we are supporting might not be able to exist without the subsidies. That makes no economic sense and would never exist in a market based economy.

Bottom line is that we need to make things again, and in order to do that we need to let the market work and the capital invested here at home to do that.

2. What are your feelings on “Right to Work”?

Personally, I believe that the Federal Government should not be involved in the hiring process of a private company. However, we have installed labor laws that call for a closed shop if half of the workers decide to unionize. So, “Right to Work” is a counter to these regulations, but it really doesn’t work. It would be easier to defund the National Labor Relations Board and repeal labor laws that interfere with hiring process of a private firm, union or not.

Let the company, workers, and the market decide what they want to do. If Company A wants to run a closed shop with union employees, let them. If Company B wants to use non-union labor, there’s nothing wrong with that either. The point is that the Federal Government should just stay out of it altogether.

3. How would you build consensus within the Republican Party, not just Tea Partiers?

I feel the message of freedom and liberty are what the Founding Fathers of our nation wanted. This should resonate with every American, not just Republicans or Democrats. To me, it should be easy to build consensus to get the government out of our lives, out of the private sector and out of foreign wars and entanglements.

Then you would be free to live your life the way you want. Businesses will be able to hire people and deliver new and innovative products to the market. We would stop spending hundreds of billions of dollars overseas and would be able to pass that savings along to the taxpayers.

We need to remember the reasons for the Constitution that the Framers had in mind at the time. We broke away from a too powerful and distant foreign central government. This country was founded on the principle of limited central government and if we remember that, building a consensus should not be too difficult.

As I watch more of the debate tonight, I’ll post more answers. Your comments are always welcome. Thanks for reading.

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What the Debate Taught Me

October 16, 2008

Tonight, I managed to watch the third presidential debate live.  I didn’t have to DVR it to watch it later.  This gave me the opportunity to watch it without the bias of reading about it first.

After all the back and forth between Obama and McCain, I realized one thing:  Americans want the Federal Government to do EVERYTHING for them.

There is a sense of entitlement that the government will provide health care, defend them from enemies, create jobs, educate their for their children, provide welfare, and make moral decisions for them.  Of course, all of this comes with lowering taxes.

As Americans, we all agree to the list above.  It is part of our core values.

There is one question we have to ask:  Is the Government the best organization to do this?  I don’t think it is.

How can roughly 700 people in Washington decide what is best for your local elementary school?  How do they decide where to allocate their resources?  Also, since they are spending taxpayer money, they are not going to find the best product for the best price.  If you or I were shopping for health coverage or schooling, we would research and find the best price for whatever fits our needs.  The government has no incentive to do this since they are just spending a pool of money.

So, instead of watching a debate about healthcare and education provided by the Federal Government, we should be debating if the Feds should be involved anyway.  Instead of arguing about a $100 a month tax break, why not argue if the income tax is necessary at all.  Not once did the candidates mention the huge unfunded burdens that Social Security and Medicare are going to become.

I’m not saying that we should abolish the Federal Government.  I just think we need to rethink what it’s role should be.  I also don’t believe in no taxes.  I think that our taxes should be paid locally, and not to a central government.

Imagine, instead of having 6% of your paycheck going to Social Security and Medicare, it could be going to an optional retirement savings account with pre-tax dollars.  Of course, there would need to be a transistion period to help fund those on Social Security, but eventually, the system could be replaced with a much more efficient one.  Your money could be stored in treasury bills or other very safe investments.  Also, since it’s optional, you would be able to stop funding your account if times got tough.

Also, why does part of our income tax go to the Department of Education?  How do politicians and bureaucrats in Washington know what’s best for your local school?  Why not have a tax that goes to schools in your area?  Also, since it will be local, there will be less waste and naturally, more oversight.  I don’t want people sitting there second guessing our local officials, but at least there would be dialogue.  Now, it is a huge Federal department where are schools are just numbers.

Probably the only part of the Federal Government that is really needed is our military.  However, it is not needed in the capacity it is used now.  We need to bring our troops home.  Not just from Iraq, but from all 150 countries they are in.  Part of the troops can be deployed to protect our borders and really make us safer.  Others can be put into reserve status or be retrained for new jobs.  This will save us billions of dollars a year.

While these proposals aren’t really that thought out, it is just a starting point to really think about the role of our government.  Americans have this sense of entitlement for their welfare.  It’s time to take control and start showing some initiative.  We need to use our imaginations and come up with real ideas of change, not just tweak the existing big government mentality we have.

I’m not saying putting these decisions in the hands of local governments will solve all of our problems.  I do think though, that it will help improve efficiency and put our tax dollars to the best use.  Who do you think knows what your community needs more – politicians in Washington?  Or people in your neighborhood?